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SpaceX to Launch PredaSAR’s First Satellite

PredaSAR announced that the first of 48 advanced commercial Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites will launch on SpaceX’s Falcon 9 launch vehicle. Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems is the launch integration provider, in addition to manufacturer of the spacecraft. As part of the agreement, PredaSAR, Tyvak, and SpaceX will be working together to optimize the deployment plan for the remainder of PredaSAR’s groundbreaking constellation, expected to be the world’s largest and most advanced commercial SAR satellite constellation.
PredaSAR CEO Maj Gen Roger Teague, USAF (Ret) commented, “PredaSAR spacecraft possess the latest in space-proven, high-quality satellite systems to support scalable and fully capable operations. PredaSAR aims to deliver critical insights and data products to both military and commercial decision makers at the speed of need. We are pleased to fly with SpaceX, a proven launch service provider to further enable the PredaSAR constellation vision of rapid, persistent ISR, anytime and anywhere.”
“We are eagerly looking forward to launching PredaSAR’s constellation with SpaceX, a trusted partner and provider of launches,” said PredaSAR Executive Chairman and Co-Founder Marc Bell. “Our satellite design has benefited from years of advanced research and development from Tyvak and allows us to bring our clients the critical, persistent data that they need.”
“For launch of the first satellite of its constellation, PredaSAR sought a reliable and schedule-certain ride on a rocket with a demonstrated record of executing launches at a high cadence,” said SpaceX Vice President of Commercial Sales Tom Ochinero. “We’re proud PredaSAR selected SpaceX as its launch provider for this very important mission.”

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