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U.S. Africa Command Awards SES-O3B Satellite Communications Contract

O3B satellite cluster being prepared for launch by Arianespace technicians. Photograph courtesy of Arianespace.

The U.S. military’s Africa Command (USAFRICOM) has contracted with SES-owned O3B to provide commercial satellite communications to better support its widespread operations across the African continent.

SES Government Solutions will provide USAFRICOM with high throughput, low-latency managed satellite communications services in the areas of their operations. It is described as a highly complex customized end-to-end solution, which will provide dedicated, flexible and secure connectivity to end users and those who support them.

The managed services include low-latency high throughput capacity, gateway services, monitoring and control, satellite terminals, field service support, as well as terrestrial backhaul. The high throughput capacity is delivered through an entire 432 MHz fully steerable Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) beam, allowing USAFRICOM to meet evolving real-time operational needs.

“We are proud to support U.S. AFRICOM not only with an entire O3b MEO beam, but also with a tailored, fully managed end-to-end service. This COMSATCOM solution provides essential fiber-like capability that enables users to meet their mission requirements,” said Pete Hoene, President and CEO of SES Government Solutions. “This is the fourth time that a U.S. Government customer has purchased an entire O3b MEO beam and the accompanying managed services from SES GS. This effort exemplifies the fully integrated mission support and industry partner relationship SES GS enjoys with our U.S. Government customers.”

The new, multi-year contract from the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) is worth U.S.$24.8 million.

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