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Raytheon To Provide Imaging Payloads for DigitalGlobe’s WorldView Legion Constellation

An artist’s conception of a WorldView Legion satellite. Image courtesy of Space Systems Loral.

Raytheon was recently selected by DigitalGlobe, Inc. as the next-generation WorldView Legion satellite imaging constellation payload provider. Under the contract, Raytheon will deliver the telescopes, detectors, and combined electronics to Space Systems Loral, the WorldView Legion space vehicle integrator.

Raytheon’s new payload doubles DigitalGlobe’s capacity to capture multispectral and 30 cm imagery, while tripling to quadrupling the company’s capacity to image high-demand areas. Once the WorldView Legion constellation is on orbit, DigitalGlobe’s combined constellation will be able to image the most rapidly changing areas on Earth every 20 to 30 minutes, from sunup to sundown. WorldView Legion will begin launching in 2020.

“We’re leveraging 45 years of extensive global experience in space imaging to provide DigitalGlobe with an unmatched view of the world from space,” said Rick Yuse, Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems president.

Raytheon’s payload solution maximizes efficiencies while maintaining quality, extending mission life, delivering a larger field of view, and increasing coverage area.

“DigitalGlobe is proud to select Raytheon to develop the imaging payloads for our next-generation WorldView Legion satellite constellation,” said Dr. Walter Scott, DigitalGlobe Founder, Executive Vice-President, and Chief Technology Officer. “We have exceptional confidence in the quality, performance, and value of Raytheon’s instrument design, which will give our customers even greater insights into global events of significance and allow them to make critical decisions with confidence for many years to come.”

Original published at: https://spacewatch.global/2017/10/raytheon-provide-imaging-payloads-digitalglobes-worldview-legion-constellation/

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