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NASA sees strong support from Biden in first 100 days

Former U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, appears before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, Wednesday, 21 April 2021, Russell Senate Office Building in Washington. Credits: NASA/Bill Ingalls

Luxembourg, 30 April 2021. – A 100 day track record: “In just the first 100 days of their administration, President Biden and Vice President Harris have expressed strong support for NASA’s goals and missions – and have laid out a vision that will guide the agency for the years to come,” said acting NASA Chief of Staff Bhavya Lal. “NASA has a vibrant future ahead under the Biden-Harris Administration.”

“In the first 100 days of the Biden-Harris Administration, NASA has taken bold steps to expand America’s exploration and scientific frontiers, advancing the nation’s commitment to build back better through innovation, combat climate change, re-establish America’s standing abroad, and inspire the next generation”, NASA said.

The Biden-Harris administration and NASA released a fiscal year 2022 budget request of $24.7 billion for NASA, an increase of more than 6% over what the agency received in 2021, NASA said.

The administration nominated Bill Nelson and Pam Melroy to be NASA administrator and deputy administrator, respectively; it tapped NASA to join the White House Climate Task Force; it pledged to land the first woman and person of color on the surface of the Moon under the Artemis program; and it expressed key support for the Artemis program and America’s Moon to Mars approach, the U.S. space agency said.

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