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Satcoms Innovation Group Announces 2023 Award Winners

Satcoms Innovation Group
Credit: Satcoms Innovation Group

Ibadan, 21 March 2023. – The Satcoms Innovation Group (SIG) has announced the winners of the 2023 SIG Awards. This year’s winners are Ashram (Engineering Program Manager, Micro-Ant), Atheras Analytics’ SGD Design Tool, Digital Intermediate Frequency Interoperability (DIFI) Consortium, and Valentin Eder (Space Analyses).

Helen Weedon, Managing Director, SIG, commented: “This is the third year that the SIG awards have been running and, as usual, the high caliber of the entries has made it incredibly difficult for the board of directors to select the winners.” Weedon also added, “the entries have each demonstrated tireless effort, bold vision, and an unwavering commitment to the satcom industry. Congratulations to all the winners and thank you to everyone who submitted an entry.”

The SIG Board awarded Valentin Eder of Space Analyses a special individual award, recognizing his contribution to furthering innovation in satcoms. Likewise, Digital Intermediate Frequency Interoperability (DIFI) Consortium won the Cooperation of the Year award for providing a simple, open, interoperable Digital IF/RF standard that replaces the natural interoperability of analog IF signals. Similarly, Atheras Analytics won the Innovation of the Year award for its SGD Design Tool that applies AI and ML techniques to optimize the design of the ground network by mitigating the effects of adverse weather and ensuring maximum network availability.

Furthermore, Ashram, Engineering Program Manager, Micro-Ant, won the award for Young Engineer of the Year for his work leading the development of the Iridium High Gain airborne antenna (Micro-Ant Airborne LeoDome).

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