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Apply Now: Internships Available For Luxembourg Students At ESA

The Luxembourg Space Agency and the European Space Agency (ESA) have signed a specific agreement with the purpose of developing professional skills in the space industry. The agreement enables young Luxembourg graduates to gain initial work experience in various specific sectors related to the aerospace industry.

This year, ESA offers a choice of 15 different internship positions to Luxembourg students.

The details about the application process and internship offers can be found here.

The high-calibre programme lasts for one year, with option for a second year, and gives successful applicants an opportunity to gain valuable experience in the development and operation of space missions. YGT’s gain valuable experience that can qualify them for the many opportunities within Europe’s space industry, renowned research institutes and, of course, ESA. This, in addition to the rich personal experience of living and working in another country and in a diverse and international environment, makes the LuxYGT programme very popular.

ESA has centers that each have well-defined responsibilities in different European countries. Currently, the positions opened under the LuxYGT program are:

  • ESRIN (European Space Research Institute), located in Frascati, Italy;
  • ESTEC (European Space Research and Technology Center), based in Noordwijk, the Netherlands;
  • ESAC (European Space Astronomy Centre), located on the outskirts of Madrid, Spain
  • ESOC (European Space Operations Center), located in Darmstadt, Germany.

Candidates interested in this professional experience are invited to submit their application by e-mail to Asmira Skrijelj, luxygt(at)space-agency.lu before 29 June 2020.

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