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Turkish Channel NATURAL TV Reaches West African Audience With SES Video Read

Credits: SES

NATURAL TV, a Turkish channel featuring health, agriculture, music and cultural content, is extending its reach to the West African audience thanks to SES Video’s broadcasting services.

Under the new agreement announced by SES, NATURAL TV will use capacity on SES’s satellite ASTRA 2G as well as uplink services from its teleport in Betzdorf, Luxembourg.

With a potential audience of five million TV homes in West Africa, the free-to-air channel, broadcast in English, aims at bringing original content from Turkey and increasing cultural awareness in the region.

SES has established a strong presence in West Africa, predominantly in Ghana and Nigeria, where it reaches two million and 2.81 million TV homes respectively. ASTRA 2G, launched in 2014, is one of SES’s satellites covering the region from the prime orbital location of 28.2 degrees East.

“We are delighted to carry the only private Turkish TV channel available to West-African viewers,” said Daniel Cop, General Manager, Sales Nordic, Baltic and Eastern Europe, at SES Video. “Not only do we provide our broadcasting services, but we will also support NATURAL TV with our local presence and our involvement in TV platforms in Ghana and Nigeria.”

“We certainly expect NATURAL TV to bring a new look to the West-African broadcast schedule with original Turkish-made broadcast content,” said Tuncay Demir, General Manager, at NATURAL TV. “Starting as a free-to-air channel, we think NATURAL TV will soon find its audience and raise interest from local TV platforms.”

Original published at: https://spacewatch.global/2017/09/turkish-channel-natural-tv-reaches-west-african-audience-ses-video-read/

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